Skip to content

The Bullet Journal-Workshop (Pt. 4): Hacking “Future Planning” with free Moleskine-Templates

Scrively and the Bullet Journal - Background (click to expand)
I have become a user of the analogue Bullet Journal organization system in the beginning of this year. For that, I have configured a Leuchtturm1917 A5 dot-grid (often the to-go notebook for Bullet Journalers) in the end of 2015 as my new years resolution, because I was tired of the – to me personally – rather ineffective digital ways of keeping track of my daily stuff. This is primarily because I have the feeling that in the digital world many things are somewhat fragmented all over the place (maybe connected by tags, which is not necessarily the most practical way) and it also is hard to really keep track of and see changes in what is going on on a daily basis.

I do, of course, effectively use many digital tools for dedicated organizational purposes (like note-taking apps, to-do lists and calendar), but use those for the rather large, complex or more long term things (e.g. larger life-goals, research projects, …). Anyway, I will soon have a separate major post coming on my personal note taking-system, which is a combination of various analogue and digital applications, products and techniques that all sort of tie into one another. This is why I won´t loose too many words on that one right here and now.

Also, I will not go too much into the details of the Bullet Journaling method because this is already covered very well on various corners of the web. I do only want say as much as the Bullet Journal being a wonderful and super-flexible method of organizing and keeping track of about anything you can think of. To use the words of the inventor of the the Bullet Journal-system, Ryder Caroll, the system “can be your to-do list, sketchbook, notebook, and diary, but most likely, it will be all of the above. It will teach you to do more with less.” And this is more than true. The system really has changed the way I go about my daily stuff. For further inspiration I can also recommend having a look at the pages of Kim and Kara, two people who also drive the BuJo-community in a way and that I do take inspiration from, too.

The Bullet Journal-Workshop is meant to share with you the ideas, add-ons, adaptations and small improvements that I have come up with myself, as I use and refine the Bullet Journal in my own everyday-life – being the flexible and open system that it really is.

I hope this section will be helpful to you, maybe serve as an inspiration and that you enjoy reading it!

 

Part 4: Enhancing your Bullet Journal’s “Future Planning” with free Moleskine-Templates

 

So this is where to get the Moleskine-Templates (login required – registration is free).

There is a vast variety of templates available. You can download about any template that is also available in the regular Moleskine notebooks – and probably even more. Some of the available templates comprise:

  • Diary & Planner Templates, e.g.
    • Weekly planner sheets
    • Monthly planner sheets (the template that I refer to in the video and use in my Bullet Journal is called the Monthly Planning Templates for 2016 Diaries/Planners and I am use the size Large)
    • Project planner sheets
  • Dot grid, ruled, squared, music, or storyboard paper
  • Templates for foldable inner notebook-pockets
  • Templates for notebook-sleeves
  • Templates for city walks

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.